Phnom Penh Boutique Guest House, Phnom Penh Accommodation, Phnom Penh, Cambodia Accommodation - Guest House - Phnom Penh Small Hotel
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Phnom Penh Culture

Phnom Penh, once called the jewel of Indochina, retains its precious, delicate quality despite its gruesome history. Though some visitors may be taken aback by the bustle and grim of Phnom Penh, most find themselves falling in love with its quaint sleepy cafes on the river, the colonial architecture and noble wats (temples) around the city. Phnom Penh still has a particular crumbling elegance and naiveté, a far cry from the fast-paced dog-eat-dog mentality found in other Asian capitals. It is divided up by a few major thoroughfares—Monivong and Norodom Boulevards going north-south and Pochentong and Sihounouk boulevards going east-west and the streets are numbered in grid fashion (i.e. Street 107, etc).

Within these passages, visitors can ride motobikes, stroll by the lethargic river, hike up the winding stairs of Wats, munch of Steak frites or explore traditional Khmer cuisine, or simply sip a coffee and dream on a side café. Travelers enjoy a day visiting the well-maintained Royal Palace and the Silver Pagoda, where historical monuments from Khmer history are delicately displayed. In addition, Phnom Penh does not ignore its grim past; at Tuol Sleng museum, one is confronted bluntly with the horrific nature of the Pol Pot’s reign. A day trip to the Killing Fields further commits to memory this dark time in Cambodia’s history. In fact, it is hard to believe with the vivacity and energy of this city, that only 30 some years ago, this town endured such hardship. Visitors should not that local Cambodians tend to be on the shy side and keep to themselves, but if anything, offer a calm smile. Also, it is not familiar in Cambodian custom to take pictures so tourists should be respect this and not take pictures of the locals.

Phnom Penh’s history

Phnom Penh’s history is both riveting and tragic. While Cambodia has breath-taking oldest cultural artifacts and world heritage sites, for instance, in Angkor Wat in the North of Cambodia, the rest of the country tends to be very agricultural and rural. Phnom Penh has international fame, however, not for its monuments necessarily, but for its bloody history, as headquarters for the Pol Pot regime during the 70s.

Phnom Penh's history begins when King Ponhea Yat abandoned Angkor Wat, the palatial colony in 1422, decided to begin his capital, Phnom Penh, on the strategic shores where two huge rivers in Cambodia join. For the next four hundred years, the reigning kings moved the capital several times, until it was recognized as the official seat of government until 1866. At this time, however, Phnom Penh was nothing like the bustling city it is today. Instead, it was really just a few, informal, huts lining the riverbed and most of the locals were fishermen or farmers. When the french colonialists entered Phnom Penh, they gave the city the civic structure that it has now. The french built canals for irrigation, roads and buildings, most of which still remain. Thanks to this energetic construction, daring Europeans flocked to Phnom Penh, which was thought to be exotic and glamorous, hence nicknamed the “Peal of Aisa”. This allure and popularity continued to burgeon until it abruptly ented in the 1960s when the Vietnam War erupted.

Due to its close proximity to Vietnam, the first affect of the war was the thousands of refugees whom fled over the borders of Vietnam and crowded into Phnom Pehn. In a short period of time, North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong took over the city, as the South Vietnamese and the Khmer Rouge fought. At the tragic date, April 17, 1975, known as the Cambodian New Year, Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge. (This day and the events to follow was commenorated in the Oscar-winning film "The Killing Fields"). Phnom Penh was completely evacuated by force so that all the foriegners in the city were forced to return back home and all the residents were pushed up into the farm lands of Cambodia where they were forced to labor for the Khmer Rouge. At this time the Khmer Rouge believed intellectuals and teachers, essentially any one who was not a farmer, was a dissident, and those they could find, they captured, tortured and killed. As the Khmer Rouge turned Phnom Penh into their headquarters, the Pol Pot regime converted Tuol Svay Prey High School into a grisley torture and prison camp, where Cambodians of all ages were imprisoned and brutally tortured. (Visitors can see pictures of the thousands of Cambodians imprisoned on these grounds today as the camp has been turned into a prison, where the beds with blood stains and nearby torture weapons are exposed for all visitors' view, so this terror can not be forgotten.

The Khmer Rouge was eventually forced out of Phnom Penh in 1979 and have been rebuilding ever since, with the help of foreign investment and foriegn aid. Today, it is a bustling city and the heart of Cambodia's political, economic and social action.

Phnom Penh Neighbours

In the north of Phnom Penh, Wat Phnom lies atop a hill as Cambodian capital's highest point at end of Norodom Boulevard. The city was supposed to be centered here and therefore, Phnom Penh was named after the woman Penh who built the ancient temple. Locals still visit the Wat to pray for luck so visitors should be respectful of this area. Tourists can climb the old, crumbling façade, ride Sam Bo the Elephant or sip on fresh fruit juice and read a book on this hilly park area.

To the east of Wat Phnom is the French Quarter, which houses some of town's most impressive surviving colonial architecture. Nearby Hotel Le Royal once housed the world's most famous war correspondents, as seen in the movie The Killing Fields. Also in this area is Boeng Kak Lake, which also contains many backpacker, hostel options and budget bars and restaurants along with the Royal School of Fine Arts, which regularly stages Khmer classical dance performances.

Psah Thmai, which means new market in Khmer, is known as Central Market to foreigners. It offers a host of goodies from meat, flowers, video games, snakes and sneakers

In the east, the Tonle Sap river runs slowly along the city; Along side, open-air restaurants and bars delicately loom from the Riverside, with music filtering lazily from their open windows and the smell of Khmer cuisine hangs in the breeze. The two-kilometer strip beginning at the Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda and ending just east of Wat Phnom includes some of the best food and nightlife options in the city. Visitors can sip Pimms or Sherry at the Foreign Correspondents' Club or fries and beer at the The Rising Sun. Wat Ounalom, one of the oldest and probably the most influential in Phnom Penh, lies amongst these restaurants.

Across the river, using the impressive Cambodian-Japanese Friendship Bridge, lies Prek Leap with its scrumptious, Khmer-style restaurants and Karaoke shows.

The grand Hotel Cambodiana Phnom Penh and Independence Monument are the main sites in the Southern side of town. The Naga Casino provides 24 hours of gambling every day.

In the West lies Toul Sleng Genocide Museum (S-21), a former high school turned torture center by the Khmer Rouge is open for visitors to view the gruesome torture techniques employed by the regime between 1975 and 1979.

Phnom Penh Day Trips from your Phnom Penh Guesthouse

A good day trip from Phnom Penh is to visit Phnom Udong, which is a small town 40km from Phnom Penh. The best way to go is via the bus route to Kompung Chhnang bound bus; travelers can get off at the 37km mark about 1 hour into the trop. The total fare is 3,500 Riel. From here, travelers can take a moto to the temple which travelers can bargain for. It is also possible to take taxis (shared) which charge from 3,000 Riel to $1 per person back to the city.

Udong was the old capital of Cambodia from 1618 to 1866. Much of the city has been destroyed over the years, first by the the Siam regime, then bombed by the United States and ruined by the Khmer Rouge. However, this mountatin is where historically kings were crowned during the old monarchy, like King Norodom Sihanouk.

However, Udong has shrines and temples which are interesting to explore for a day. There are various stupas that are said to house the remains of kings, including that of King Monivong and King Norodom Sihanouk's father, King Ang Duong. These ornate stupas are ornamented with Cambodian-style floral patterns- similar to those in Anknor Wat. The grand stones, gateways and pilars are carved amongst fabled creatures like nagas which are large, seven-headed serpents and garudas which are half-bird, half-human. Figures of elephants are considered protectors of the remains. One of the stupas is carved on top with the face of Buddha facing four directions, a style reminiscent of the Bayon temples in Angkor Wat. To get to the top of Udong, travelers will need to climb 509 stairs, which can be difficult in the midday sun. This path leads to a new, glitzy modern temple where a famous Buddha relic (some bones and a tooth) lies. However, from this height, travelers can visit the stupa Chedi Damrei Sam Poan holds the remains of King Soriyopor. The most important temple to view is the remains of Arthaross temple, which is large and badly damaged by the war. Travelers still enjoy the remains of a Buddha on his lap and the tranquility of the area. In the temple flags hang and colorful offerings have been left in from the various Buddha relics. As the legend goes, all the riches of Cambodia was stored beneath this Buddha but Chinese visitors heard this and returned to the state with worry that the Khmer people may rule the world. Thus the Chinese asked the Khmer to build a temple over the cavern that looks at China. Thus this temple faces north rather than east as most Buddhist temples.

One note is that the amount of begging is very high here, where little children and adults line the steps to the temples, asking for money and food. Since Udong is a silversmith village, many vendors offer silver trinkets. There are also vendors selling food stuffs and textiles and there typically is a lot of garbage which can be distracting.

Not far from Oudong is Longvaek. It once housed a temple but now a new wat has been built over the laterite stones from the site. What is unique about this place is that it was the strong hold for the Khmers against the invading Siamese. In the country surrounding the wat, are surreal sculptures and small shrines. It is almost like a miniature golf course. There is a concrete temple adorned with heads that look like fat Albert.

Festivals

The biggest and most impressive festivals in Cambodia is the celebrated water festival, called Bonn Om Touk. This festival celebrates the beginning of the fishing season and the change of current in the Tonle Sap River. The three-day festival during November brings more than a million faithful spectators to the center of Phnom Penh, overlooking the river. During the day, hundreds of colorful, fabulously decorated long boats, pushed by 40 to 50 men, compete down the river. At the head of the boats are gold naga, water serpents. These races are in remembrance of the skilled and powerful navy of King Jayavarman II, the 9th-century founder of the great Angkorian Empire. During the night there are revelers and fireworks, as the boats float on display for the public.

The festival of Bonn Pchum Ben is held in late September or October. This is a festival for remembering those who have passed away and is participated by whole families. For 15 days, the families make various offerings and alms to the Buddhist monks, like sweets and savory goods. Then on the 15 th day, at night under the full moon, families give offerings to the Silver Pagoda, in memory of the deceased. During Phcum Benh, the city of Phnom Penh is mostly deserted as many of the locals would return to their homeland provinces away from the city.

Also in October is the celebration of the Kings Birthday, which is a national holiday. The city comes alive with fireworks displays along the river. Onlookers flock to the Royal Palace, which is open to the public that day.

There is an art festival held in April at the front of the National Museum, called Val Menh in the heart of the city. The event is free, open to locals and visitors alike, that displays Cambodian performers, musicians, actors and artists.

Off the Beaten Path

There are a variety of daytrips to do outside of Phnom Penh’s city centre, and your Guest House, such as visits to a local weaving village, Phnom Chisor, and Tonle Bati Lake. Visitors can go from Phnom Penh to a Mekong River fishing village on a small touring boat and visit to a silk weaving village and sunset on the Mekong River. Expeditions like this can be arranged by asking staff at your hotel, through any travel agency in town, or simply by hiring a tuk-tuk guy or moto guy to take you out there. You will have to negotiate the fee witht the driver if you do it on your own.

Another popular visit is to Oudong, which is 41 km north of Phnom Penh. Oudong, the former capital city of Cambodia, is a good way to learn about the history of the area and see remains. You can take a bus there, or arrange a taxi to take you there (upwards of $30 for a round-trip).

One can also visit the Phnom Tamao Wildlife Sanctuary, (012 842 271), 44 kms from Phnom Penh. This 6,000 acres of forested area is a sanctuary for animals that have been resecued from trafficking or abuse. Admission is US$5. Betelnut Jeep Tours, which operate out of the Lazy Gecko Cafe, offer trips to the sanctuary from Tuesday~Saturday.

To get a glimpse of Cambodia's brutal history, visit Choeung Ek Memorial (The Killing Fields) 15 km southwest of the city. This site can be easily reached via moto or taxi, depending on how much money visitors wish to pay. The Tuol Sleng "Genocide Museum" is open every day from 8am to 5pm. A $2 entry fee is charged for the Museum and a tour with guide costs about US$2-3. You can also go for the audio tour. The Killing Fields shows the place where the Pol Pot regime brutally massacred thousands of Cambodians who were considered counter-regime and left their remains in large dug-outs in the ground. The extremity of these massacres was not fully known until after the regime was thrown. While grass-covered pits remain where the bodies were once dumped (the mass graves containing the remains of close to 9000 bodies were exhumed), there is a memorial tower in the field containing a large collection of bones and skulls which was erected in 1988.

Guesthouse in Phnom Penh.

4memories, Phnom Penh, Guesthouse located near the Russian Market - small hotel guesthouse ideal for Phnom Penh visits. 5 Guesthouse rooms, clean rooms, budget hotel. Phnom Penh guesthouse suitable for volunteer workers, NGO workers. Guesthouse price range - $20 - $35 a night. A cheap, clean, guesthouse in Phnom Penh. This Phnom Penh guesthouse has WIFI in all Phnom Penh guesthouse rooms, and a Phnom Penh guesthouse cafe that is open to public. The guesthouse helps disadvantaged youths with training in the Phnom Penh guesthouse.

 

The capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia, Phnom Penh, is located at the confluence of three rivers - the Mekong, the Bassac and Tonle Sap. The city is divided into three sections - the north, an attractive residential area; the south or the French part of the city with its ministries, banks and colonial houses; and the centre or the heart with its narrow lanes, markets, foods stalls and shops.

Over the past four years, the city has undergone tremendous changes - businesses are springing up constantly and tourism is once again booming. Cambodia has one of the most liberal investment laws to further boost managed to retain its charm and character - cyclos that weave through traffic with ease, broad boulevards, old colonial buildings, parks and green spaces that reminds one of the country's French heritage, and above all its people who always have a smile for you.

A stone's throw away from the Tonle Sap is the royal Palace built on the site of the Banteay Kev, a citadel built in 1813. The Palace grounds contain several buildings: the Throne Room of Prasat Tevea Vinichhay which is used for the coronation of kings, official receptions and traditional ceremonies; the Chan Chhaya Pavilion which is a venue for dance performances; the king's official residence called the Khemarin; the Napoleon Pavilion and the spectacular Silver Pagoda. This pagoda is worth exploring. It owes its name to the 5,000 silver tiles weighing 1kg each which cover the entire floor.

The emerald Buddha sits on a pedestal high atop the dias. In front of the dias stands a life-size Buddha made of solid gold and weighs 75kg. It is decked with precious gems including diamonds, the largest of which is 25 carats. Also on display at the sides are the coronation apparel and numerous miniature Buddha in gold and silver.

The walls surrounding the compound which is the oldest part of the palace, are covered with frescos depicting scenes from the Khmer version of the Ramayana.

INDEPENDENCE MONUMENT

The monument was built in 1958 to symbolise the independence that Cambodia gained from France in 1953. The French fully abandonned their interests in Indochina following defeat by the Vietnamese at the battle of Dien Bien Phu in May 1954. Independence is marked in Cambodia o­n the 9th November. The monument has a unique and peculiar style and doubles as a memorial to Cambodian patriots who died for their country.

NATIONAL MUSEUM
The NATIONAL MUSEUM of Cambodia is housed in a graceful terracotta structure of traditional design (built 1917-20) just north of the Royal Palace. It is open Tuesday to Sunday from 8 to 11 am and from 2 to 5 pm; entry is $3. Photography is prohibited inside. The School of Fine Arts (École des Beaux-arts) has its headquarters in a structure behind the main building.

WAT PHNOM
You may also want to check out WAT PHNOM which sits on a tree covered hill about 30m high in the northeast of the city. It is said that the first pagoda was built in 1373 to house four statues of the Buddha deposited here by the Mekong river. It was discovered by a woman named Penh. Thus, the name Phnom Penh, the hill of Penh. The people believe that this temple is powerful in that anyone who makes a wish will have it granted. It is not surprising to see many people coming here to pray for protection or healing. Many bring lotus flowers as offerings for prayers answered.

At the bottom of the hill is a small zoo, but its most endearing residents, the monkeys, live free in the trees. See more...

TUOL SLENG MUSEUM
In 1975,Tuol Svay Prey High School was taken over by Pol Pot's security force and turned into a prison known as Security Prison 21 (S-21) It soon became the largest such centre of detention and torture in the country. Over 17,000 people held at S-21 were taken to the extermination camp at Choeung Ek to be executed; detainees who die during torture were buried in mass graves in the prison grounds. See more...

CHEUNG EK KILLING FIELD
Between 1975 and 1978,aabout 17,000 men, women, children and infants (including nine westerners), detained and tortured at S-21 prison (now Tuol Sleng Museum), were transported to the extermination to death to avoid wasting precious bullets. See more...

NEW CENTRAL MARKET
A visit to the markets and market halls is a must as they give an opportunity to be acquainted with the country's local produce and also to buy textiles, antiques, gold and silver jewellery.

The four wings of the yellow coloured Central Market are teeming with numerous stalls selling gold and silver jewellery, antique coins, clothing, clocks, flowers, food, fabrics, shoes and luggage.

TUOL TOM PONG MARKET
For some good paintings or if you prefer antiques, head fro the Tuol Tom Poong Market also known as the Russian Market. A word of caution though: you need to sharpen your bargaining skills as the prices here can be outrageously high.

Ethnic Composition

The population of Cambodia today is about 10 million. About 90-95 percent of the people are Khmer ethnic. The remaining 5-10 percent include Chinese-Khmers, Khmer Islam or Chams, ethnic hill-tribe people, known as the Khmer Loeu, and Vietnamese. About 10 percent of the population lives in Phnom Penh, the capital, making Cambodia largely a country of rural dwellers, farmers and artisans.

The ethnic groups that constitute Cambodian society possess a number of economic and demographic commonalties- for example. Chinese merchants lived mainly in urban centers and play middlemen in many economic cycles, but they also preserve differences in their social and cultural institutions. They were concentrated mostly in central and in southeastern Cambodia, the major differences among these groups lie in social organization, language, and religion.

The majority of the inhabitants of Cambodia are settled in fairly permanent villages near the major bodies of water in the Tonle Sap Basin-Mekong Lowlands region. The Khmer Loeu live in widely scattered villages that are abandoned when the cultivated land in the vicinity is exhausted. The permanently settled Khmer and Cham villages usually located on or near the banks of a river or other bodies of water. Cham villages usually are made up almost entirely of Cham, but Khmer villages, especially in central and in southeastern of Cambodia, typically include sizable Chinese communities.

The Khmer Loeu

The Khmer Loeu are the non-Khmer highland tribes in Cambodia. The Khmer Loeu are found namely in the northeastern provinces of Rattanakiri, Stung Treng, Mondulkiri and Crate. Most Khmer Loeu live in scattered temporary villages that have only a few hundred inhabitants. These villages usually are governed by a council of local elders or by a village headman.

The Khmer Loeu cultivate a wide variety of plants, but the man crop is dry or upland rice growth by the slash-and-burn method. Hunting, fishing, and gathering supplement the cultivated vegetable foods in the Khmer Loeu diet.

Houses vary from huge multi-family long houses to small single family structures. They may be built close to the ground or on stilts. The major Khmer Loeu groups in Cambodia are the Kuy, Phnong, Brao, Jarai, and Rade. All but about 160,000 Kuy lived in the northern Cambodia provinces of Kampong Thom, Preah Vihear, and Stoeng as well as in adjacent Thailand.

The Cham

The Cham people in Cambodia descend from refugees of the Kingdom of Champa, which one ruled much of Vietnam between Gao Ha in the north and Bien Hao in the south.

The Cambodian Chams are divided into two groups, the orthodox and the traditional- base on their religious practices. The orthodox group, which make up about one-third of the total number of Chams in the country, were located mainly in Phnom Penh - Oudong area and in the provinces of Takeo and Kapot.

The traditional Chams were scattered throughout the midsection of the country in the provinces of Battambang, Kompong Thom, Kompong Cham, and Pursat. The Chams of both groups typically live in villages inhabited only by other Chams; the villages may be along the shores of watercourses, or they may be inland. The inhabitants of the river villages engage in fishing and growing vegetables. They trade fish to local Khmer for rice.

The women in these villages earn money by weaving. The Chams who live inland support themselves by various means, depending on the villages. Some villages specialize in metalworking; others raise fruit trees or vegetables. The Chams also often serve as butchers of cattle for their Khmer Buddhist neighbors and are, in some areas, regarded as skillful water buffalo and ram breeders.

The Chinese

The Chinese in Cambodia formed the country es largest ethnic minority. Sixty percent of the Chinese were urban dwellers engaged mainly in commerce; the other 40 percent were rural residents working as shopkeepers, as buyers and processors of rice, palm sugar, fruit, and fish, and as money lenders.

It is estimated that 90 percent of the Chinese in Cambodia were in commerce and that 92 percent of those involved in commerce in Cambodia were Chinese. In rural Cambodia, the Chinese were moneylenders, and they wielded considerable economic power over the ethnic Khmer peasants through usury.

The Chinese in Cambodia represented five major linguistic groups, the largest of which was the Teochiu (accounting about 60 percent), followed by the Cantonese (accounting about 20 percent), the Hokkien (accounting about 7 percent), and the Hakka and the Hainanese (each accounting for 4 percent). Those belonging to the certain Chinese linguistic groups in Cambodia tended to gravitate to certain occupations.

The Teochiu, who make up about 90 percent of the rural Chinese population, ran village stores, control rural credit and rice marketing facilities, and grew vegetables. In urban areas they were often engaged in such enterprises as the import-export business, the sale of pharmaceuticals, and street peddling. The Cantonese, who were the majority of Chinese groups before Teochiu migrations began in the late 1930s, live mainly in the city. Typically, the Cantonese engages in transportation and in constriction, for the most part as mechanics or carpenters.

The Hokkien community was involved import-export and in banking, and it included some of the countryfs richest Chinese. The Hainanese started out as pepper growers in Kompot Province, where they continued to dominate that business. Many moved to Phnom Penh , where, in the late 1960s, they reportedly had virtual monopoly on the hotel and restaurant business. They also often operated tailor shops. In Phnom Penh, the newly arrived Hakka were typically folk dentists, sellers of traditional Chinese medicines, and shoemakers.

The Vietnamese

The Vietnamese community is scattered throughout southeastern and central Cambodia. They were concentrated in Phnom Penh, and in Kandal, Prey Veng, and Kampong Cham provinces. No close cultural or religious ties exist between Cambodia and Vietnam.

The Vietnamese fall within the Chinese culture sphere, rather within the Indian, where the Thai and Khmer belong. The Vietnamese differ from the Khmer in mode of dress, in kinship organization, and in many other ways- for example the Vietnamese are Mahayama Buddhists while most of the Cambodians are Theravada Buddhists. Although Vietnamese lived in urban centers such as Phnom Penh, a substantial number lived along the lower Mekong and Bassac rivers as well as on the shores of the Tonle Sap, where they engaged in fishing.

Hotels and Guesthouses in Phnom Penh:

Raffles Hotel Le Royal
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Mittapheap Hotel
262, Monivong Blvd, Khan Daun Penh, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Cambodiana Hotel

13, Sisovath Quay, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Inter-Continental Hotel
296 Mao Tse Tong Boulevard, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Imperial Garden Hotel
315 Sisowath Quay, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Phnom Penh Hotel
53, Monivong Boulevard, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

HIC INN Cambodia
84, Monivong Blvd, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Pacific Hotel
234 Monivong Blvd, Sangkat Phsar Thmey II., Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Himawari Hotel Apartment
313 Sisowath Quay, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Juliana Hotel
16 Juliana 152 Road, Sangkat Vealvong, Khan 7 Makara (Near Batook School), Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Sunway Hotel
1, Street 92, Sangkat Wat Phnom, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

FCC Phnom Penh Hotel
363 Sisowath Quay, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

La Parranda Hotel
207, Mao Tsetong Blvd., Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Holiday Villa Hotel
89 Monivong Boulevard, Sangkat Monorom, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Tai Ming Plaza Hotel
281, Norodom Blvd, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Guesthouses

Phnom Penh Information
Phnom Penh is the vibrant bustling capital of Cambodia. Situated at the confluence of three rivers, the mighty Mekong, the Bassac and the great Tonle Sap, what was once considered the 'Gem' of Indochina. The capital city still maintains considerable charm with plenty to see. It exudes a sort of provincial charm and tranquillity with French colonial mansions and tree-lined boulevards amidst monumental Angkorian architecture. Phnom Penh is a veritable oasis compared to the modernity of other Asian capitals. A mixture of Asian exotica, the famous Cambodian hospitality awaits the visitors to the capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia.

Here in the capital, are many interesting touristy sites. Beside the Royal Palace, the Silver Pagoda, the National Museum, the Toul Sleng Genocide Museum, the Choeng Ek Killing Fields and Wat Phnom, there are several market places selling carvings, paintings, silk, silver, gems and even antiques. Indeed, an ideal destination for a leisurely day tour. The whole area including the outskirts of Phnom Penh is about 376 square kilometres big. There are currently 2,009,264 people living in Phnom Penh.

The city takes its name from the re-known Wat Phnom Daun Penh (nowadays: Wat Phnom or Hill Temple), which was built in 1373 to house five statues of Buddha on a man made hill 27 meters high. These five statues were floating down the Mekong in a Koki tree and an old wealthy widow named Daun Penh (Grandma Penh) saved them and set them up on this very hill for worshiping. Phnom Penh was also previously known as Krong Chaktomuk (Chaturmukha) meaning "City of Four Faces". This name refers to the confluence where the Mekong, Bassac, and Tonle Sap rivers cross to form an "X" where the capital is situated.

Phnom Penh is also the gateway to an exotic land - the world heritage site, the largest religious complex in the world, the temples of Angkor in the west, the beaches of the southern coast and the ethnic minorities of the North-eastern provinces. There are also a wide variety of services including five star hotels and budget guest houses, fine international dining, sidewalk noodle shops, neighbourhood pubs international discos and more.

Phnom Penh, like other Asian-City tourist destinations, is in the midst of rapid change. Over the past few years the number of restaurants and hotels have grown considerably and in the last year there had been a huge increase in the number of visitors. Come and see a real original as it won't be the same in a few years.

Phnom Penh InformationPhnom Penh is the vibrant bustling capital of Cambodia. Situated at the confluence of three rivers, the mighty Mekong, the Bassac and the great Tonle Sap, what was once considered the 'Gem' of Indochina. The capital city still maintains considerable charm with plenty to see. It exudes a sort of provincial charm and tranquillity with French colonial mansions and tree-lined boulevards amidst monumental Angkorian architecture. Phnom Penh is a veritable oasis compared to the modernity of other Asian capitals. A mixture of Asian exotica, the famous Cambodian hospitality awaits the visitors to the capital of the Kingdom of Cambodia.

Here in the capital, are many interesting touristy sites. Beside the Royal Palace, the Silver Pagoda, the National Museum, the Toul Sleng Genocide Museum, the Choeng Ek Killing Fields and Wat Phnom, there are several market places selling carvings, paintings, silk, silver, gems and even antiques. Indeed, an ideal destination for a leisurely day tour. The whole area including the outskirts of Phnom Penh is about 376 square kilometres big. There are currently 2,009,264 people living in Phnom Penh.

The city takes its name from the re-known Wat Phnom Daun Penh (nowadays: Wat Phnom or Hill Temple), which was built in 1373 to house five statues of Buddha on a man made hill 27 meters high. These five statues were floating down the Mekong in a Koki tree and an old wealthy widow named Daun Penh (Grandma Penh) saved them and set them up on this very hill for worshiping. Phnom Penh was also previously known as Krong Chaktomuk (Chaturmukha) meaning "City of Four Faces". This name refers to the confluence where the Mekong, Bassac, and Tonle Sap rivers cross to form an "X" where the capital is situated.

Phnom Penh is also the gateway to an exotic land - the world heritage site, the largest religious complex in the world, the temples of Angkor in the west, the beaches of the southern coast and the ethnic minorities of the North-eastern provinces. There are also a wide variety of services including five star hotels and budget guest houses, fine international dining, sidewalk noodle shops, neighbourhood pubs international discos and more.

Phnom Penh, like other Asian-City tourist destinations, is in the midst of rapid change. Over the past few years the number of restaurants and hotels have grown considerably and in the last year there had been a huge increase in the number of visitors. Come and see a real original as it won't be the same in a few years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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